In Conversation With:

LAURA SALES

Laura was born and raised in Barcelona. She studied analog photography, audiovisual lighting and later Fine Art. Her most recent project "Conversations with Myself" is a series of self portraits she has taken during isolation. 

"I encourage everyone to practice self-portraiture as a mode of introspection."

Your photos are also extremely cinematic, do you find many of your influences within films?

Throughout my whole life, I have realized that when I watched films what struck me most was the lighting and the set design. I like to take inspiration from cinema to create scenes with timeless environments that are difficult to classify.

Apart from the influence that cinema has had on my style, I also consider that everything I have learned during my Fine Arts studies have been important in the development of my artistic personality.

Another artistic aspect that inspires me deeply is painting, which is also one of my main forms of artistic expression. I compose my scenes using the light as if it were a painting.

How do you create a distinct style through the medium of photography?

As I’ve just mentioned, for me the most important element of photography is the lighting. I have always thought that the right type of lighting can change everything. I think what makes my aesthetic special or different is my way of giving importance to light.

One of the concepts that I am working on in my latest projects, in which I’m  trying to develop my own style, is reflection. For this, I use light to reflect feelings from my inner world. This is why in many of my works mirrors or fragments appear.

One symbol that thrives in many of my photographs is the eye. This has to do with the importance that I give to this organ through which I observe and capture reality as I perceive it.

In what direction would you like your creative image to progress?

This question is a bit complicated for me, because at this moment in my life I am exploring my resources. I am in an experimental phase of my creative process. During this phase,  I don’t only experiment  within the field of photography, but also, in other areas such as painting or sculpture.

 

How have you been staying creative at such an isolating and uncertain time?

Returning to the topic of self-portrait, if I used it as a tool before isolation, now I have more reason. I have learned to get the most out of a reduced space, and demonstrate that with few technical resources, work with aesthetic quality can be created.

 

I have managed to combat the most depressing aspect of this situation in isolation by turning it into a source of inspiration. Before the government lockdown, I found myself in a creative block, and yet it has been “forced intimacy” which has helped me to inspire myself.

 

It has not been easy but I have realized that when I feel my worst is when I produce more things. It's like a damn roller coaster of emotions.

What first led you to photography?

I realized that photography caught my attention when I was  given my first mobile phone with a camera as a gift. I loved capturing moments. I remember going on a trip with my parents and feeling the need to capture scenes that I considered special.

 Much later I discovered analog photography. I was fascinated by  taking photographs and then having to wait to see the results. I was hooked on that emotion you feel when you develop film. That's how I started my academic photography training, learning to develop my film myself in a laboratory. There I discovered the importance of lighting in photography, without even knowing how much that it would influence my aesthetic conception.

Your works are very intimate, what do you enjoy most about self-portraiture?

Using self-portraits as an artistic tool has helped me to know myself better. Self-portraits provided me with the possibility to experiment with my image, my way of seeing myself and the world. It is also a way to carry out my projects independently. One of the things I enjoy most about self-portraits is being able to do it alone, it is like my moment. I lock myself in my room and ideas emerge. It is almost therapeutic. I encourage everyone to practice self-portraiture as a mode of introspection.

"I compose my scenes using the light as if it were a painting."

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"I have learned to get the most out of a reduced space"

C O N T A C T

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